Tag Archives: garden

Seed Saving Time: Spinach

Garden spinach (Spinacia oleracea). Image via Wikimedia Commons.By Jill Henderson – Show Me Oz

Spinach is one of the very earliest crops planted and harvested from the garden in spring.  As a member of the Amaranth family (formerly classified as the Chenopodia family), spinach is naturally packed with fiber, protein, and high levels of essential vitamins and minerals.  If you’ve never grown your own spinach or had freshly prepared spinach, you are in for a real treat!  And if you already love spinach and grow it in your garden every year, then why not try saving your own seed?  You’ll not only be rewarded with oodles of eating pleasure, but you’ll save a ton of money, too!

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The Indoor Winter Herb Garden

Potted Oregano Copyright Jill HendersonBy Jill Henderson

Gardeners can enjoy the sight, smell and taste of culinary herbs long after summer’s end.  By providing adequate light, warmth and moisture, culinary herbs will grow well enough indoors to provide the discriminating chef with plenty of savory flavors for the pot all winter long.

Flying Flowers: The Beauty of Butterflies

Butterfly on coreopsis. Copyright Jill Henderson - Show Me OzBy Jill Henderson – Show Me Oz

Butterflies must be one of the most beloved creatures of all time. They exist almost everywhere on the planet and their diverse forms are absolutely one of the most astounding feats of creation. In Missouri alone, there are 198 recorded species of butterfly; from the seemingly dull skipper to the fantastically impressive swallowtail. The Ozarks have enough butterflies to keep even avid butterfly lovers happy. Continue reading

Grow Your Own Ginger

http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Zingiber_officinale20090901_02.jpgBy Birgit ‘B’ Bradtke – Guest Contributor

When I began growing ginger I expected it to be difficult, but it’s not.  I’ve been growing ginger at home for years and it is a serious contender for the title of “most neglected plant” in my garden. In fact, I look at my ginger plants exactly once a year at harvest time. I harvest them, replant them and then forget about them for another year.  I easily grow a year’s supply of ginger and have plenty left over to give away. You can grow your own ginger using store-bought ginger root and you can easily grow it in pots or tubs.  On this page I tell you everything you need to know about growing ginger, so you can grow your own fresh ginger, too. Continue reading

A Successful Community Seed Swap

2012 3-1 Seed Swap - Let the Swapping Begin (2)smallOn March 1st, the community of West Plains, Missouri, held their first-ever community seed swap!  It was a fun and busy day with over 35 people in attendance.  Dubbed the Ozarks Pot Luck & Seed Swap, my dream was to bring together area gardeners to share their knowledge and experience with other gardeners and to promote the concept of saving one’s own seed.   I was understandably nervous in the hours leading up to the swap, but all that quickly flew out of the window when I walked into the facility to find a room full of friends who had arrived early and were already setting up the tables!  Continue reading

Propagating Herbs: Division

5638123732_b9c6e5f532_mBy Jill Henderson

By now your garden honey-do list is probably getting pretty long, but if you haven’t done it yet, now is the absolute best time to propagate perennial herbs and flowers through cutting, layering and division.  Vegetative propagation is best achieved during periods of active growth such as spring and fall, with spring being the best season overall.  During this time the plant is filled with growth hormones in the stems and roots, and you can take advantage of those natural growth stimulators to multiply your mature plantings.  This article on herb propagation comes from my book, The Healing Power of Kitchen Herbs. Continue reading