Super Easy Refrigerator Jalapeno Slices

Making jalapeno slices. Image copyright Jill Henderson Show Me Oz (6) finished productJill Henderson ~ Show Me Oz

Gardening and processing the bounty is both rewarding and time-consuming. So, any time I find a way to make preserving the harvest easier, I’m all in! Today, I’d like to share my recipe for Super Simple Refrigerator Jalapeno Slices and my best tips for slicing and deseeding hot peppers without the burn!

I don’t know about you, but I’ve got a to-do list that never seems to end! And even though the garden is getting wrapped up for the year, there is still plenty to harvest and process before the first frost sets in. This year, that last minute harvest includes an abundance of big, fat jalapeno peppers that I plan on turning into scrumptiously spicy jalapeno slices.  With all the other things on my to-do list, breaking out the canner is the last thing I want to do. In fact, I never can pickles, kraut, or jalapeno slices anymore. Refrigerator preservation is fast, easy and safe as long as you get the acidity right. I’ve used this recipe for many years now and it’s not only safe, fast, and easy, but produces the crispest, most flavorful jalapeno slices I’ve ever tasted!

The first step to making your own slices is to gather the jalapeno fruits and give them a quick rinse. There’s no need to dry them – just toss them into a colander to drain for a few minutes.  To make these slices you will need 15-20 large jalapenos for a pint and roughly 30 for a quart. If you have a lot of jalapenos and want to do them all at once, the recipe can be easily adapted to suite your needs.

The next step is to slice all your peppers into rings and, if you don’t want your jalapeno rings to be overly hot and seedy, you will want to deseed them, too. Now, if you’ve ever spent any time handling hot peppers, you probably dread this part of the job. No matter how many times you wash your hands or what kind of gloves  you wear, the capsicum-laden juice of hot peppers just seems to wind up on your fingers and eventually in other uncomfortable places! Not to worry, though – I’ve got you covered on both accounts.

After many years of handling these spicy and very seedy fruits, I have found a super simple and relatively pain-free method of slicing deseeding hot peppers. Start by fitting a colander that has relatively big holes into a similar sized bowl or pot. It’s important that the colander nests down into the bowl so all the holes are inside the bowl. This can be set into the sink to help keep messes to a minimum.

Making jalapeno slices. Image copyright Jill Henderson Show Me Oz (2) slicingGather up your peppers, a large cutting board and a nice sharp knife. If you leave the stem attached to the fruits during harvest, you can use them as handles that will keep you fingers from burning for the rest of the day. Simply hold the stem in one hand and begin slicing the pepper from the pointy end. When you get too close to the stem for comfort, simply toss the end piece into the compost bucket.

As your cutting board gets filled with slices scrape them into the colander in the sink. Once you’ve got all the peppers you want cut up and in the colander, cover it with the lid that goes with the bowl or pot you’re using, or even just a dinner plate. Using both hands, hold the entire ensemble together at the rim and shake vigorously up and down three or four times. This throttling dislodges most of the seeds from the slices, which then fall out of the colander and into the pot. Check the progress frequently to avoid breaking your slices into pieces.

Making jalapeno slices. Image copyright Jill Henderson Show Me Oz (4) DeseedingOnce you’ve removed the seeds to your satisfaction, add a little water to the bowl and swish the seeds around before pouring them into a compost bucket. This methods keeps you from having to touch the hot pepper juice on either your slices or the seeds!

Now that your slices are ready for pickling, mix the brine ingredients from the recipe below in a pot that will hold all the jalapeno slices. If you are making a quart or less, a medium saucepan works beautifully. If you cut up all the peppers you had and aren’t sure how many jars they will fill, you will need to determine how many cups you have and make the appropriate amount of brine to cover. A pint is 2 cups and a quart is 4 cups, but keep in mind that the slices will shrink down a bit after being heated in the brine.

For One Pint………..……..For One Quart
¾ c. white vinegar………………1 ½ c
¾ c. water……………………..…..1 ½ c.
4 Tbs. granulated sugar……….½ c.
1 Tbs. Kosher salt……………….2 Tbs.
2 toes garlic, crushed……..…..4 toes
½ tsp. oregano, dry…..……….1 tsp.
15 lg. jalapenos…………………..30

Making jalapeno slices. Image copyright Jill Henderson Show Me Oz (5) blanching

Bring the brine to a full boil. Quickly add all of the jalapeno slices and stir or turn them so all are coated with brine. Immediately remove the pot from the heat and cover with a lid. Every three or four minutes, stir the peppers around. When all of the slices change from bright green to olive green, pack them into jars and cover with as much brine as will fit.  Screw on the lid and let cool. Store in the refrigerator. Slices are ready to eat right away, but the flavor is better after a few days. I routinely keep my jalapeno slices in the refrigerator until the following gardening season without any problems at all. But to be on the safe side, the recommended storage time is about three months.

I hope you enjoy this super simple recipe for homemade jalapeno slices. Please let me know if you try this recipe out and like it!  Until then, happy cooking!

Show Me Oz | Living and loving life in the Ozarks!
Gardening, foraging, herbs, homesteading, slow food, nature, and more!
© Jill Henderson


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Jill Henderson is an artist, author, and the editor of Show Me Oz  Her books, The Healing Power of Kitchen Herbs, The Garden Seed Saving Guide and A Journey of Seasons and Illuminati Agenda 21 can be found in the Show Me Oz Bookstore.  Jill is a featured columnist for Acres USA and a contributing author to Llewellyn’s Herbal Almanac and her work has appeared in The Permaculture Activist and The Essential Herbal.


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4 responses to “Super Easy Refrigerator Jalapeno Slices

  1. Thanks Jill, very useful recipe, I used to buy ready made Jalapeno peppers from the store, in a jar I love them. I am very happy for this recipe, but I have a question for you Jill: do you grow Jalapeno pepper or buy them? Where do you buy them raw?
    Do you store also red peppers like this in a jar?

    • I almost always grow my own jalapenos, Laura. If I don’t, I try to barter with gardening friends for them. I imagine most farmer’s markets would have them in season. I don’t store other peppers this way. I dry most other hot peppers and freeze the sweet ones.

  2. I was curious Jill as we preserve the sweet peppers /red/yellow as pickles, similar as you do your Jalapenos. There is no climate and market here for Jalapeno ( I miss them as I used to eat them in Canada, you can only find them pickled in stores and those are imported from Spain), but I can find dry chilli peppers. I love hot things, they are good for your health but they kinda irritate you colon sometimes. It is a great think Jill you have your own garden and do your own organic thing.
    Imagine I managed to find a farmer and keep contact with him so I can buy home organic wine from him and guess what I found: most of Romanian farmers stopped digging in the vineyard, they use roundup to spray the grapes, they are lazy and want more profit. The farmer said that group of people of that specific village close to my home have liver problems. So having your own garden these days is a treasure. Health is the most important.
    As for pickles they need to be clean without preservatives but unfortunately the store does not care of health of people, so we must prepare our own homemade.

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