Tag Archives: cooking with

Healthful Horseradish

Young horseradish. Image via Jill Henderson showmeoz.wordpress.comJill Henderson ~ Show Me Oz
Horseradish is one of those herbs that everyone knows about, but few actually grow. Perhaps that’s because it isn’t used much in today’s cooking, or perhaps because it’s hard to process. And like mint, horseradish has a nasty reputation for overstepping its boundaries in the garden. Yet, for its flaws, horseradish is a pretty perennial that is tough as nails and easy to grow. And not only is horseradish full on flavor, but it is totally jam-packed with health benefits that include fighting cancer, improving cardiovascular health, and even reducing plaque on teeth!

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Healthful Ginger for the Holidays

A spoonful of ginger.The Holiday Season is in full swing and with it comes an almost insane schedule of shopping, entertaining, special events and, of course, dining out and cooking for friends and family.  And while the holidays sure can be fun, they aren’t always so good for our health in terms of stress, lack of sleep, colds and flu and the good old-fashioned belly ache from eating way too much “good stuff”.   Luckily, the holidays are naturally festooned with some of the most potent healing herbs and spices in the world including cinnamon, cloves, allspice, nutmeg, and ginger – one of my all time favorites.  Not only does ginger taste great in a dizzying array of holiday dishes, it can also make you feel better when the holidays get the best of you.

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Garden Time: Temptingly Tart Sorrel – Part II

French Sorrel image copyright Jill HendersonBy Jill Henderson – Show Me Oz

Last week, I talked about the various types of edible sorrel that can be grown in the garden or wild foraged.  The two most commonly cultivated species are Common Sorrel (Rumex acetosa) and French Sorrel (Rumex scutatus), followed by their wild counterparts, Sheep’s Sorrel (Rumex acetosella) and Red-veined Sorrel or Bloody Dock (Rumex sanguineus).  Of these, French sorrel is the most popular for cooking and fresh eating.  This week, we’ll take a closer look at how to use French and Garden Sorrel in the kitchen and then delve into the medicinal aspect of these overlooked herbs.

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