Tag Archives: growing

River Hills Harvest Raises Elderberry Production to New Levels

Durham shows off a full head of elderflowers.jpgJill Henderson ~ Show Me Oz
Acres USA – April 2017 issue

In the heart of the Midwest, River Hills Harvest is riding the new wave of demand for elderberry products. At the helm of this enterprise is Terry Durham, a long time advocate of sustainable agriculture, a builder of ground-breaking organizations and an elderberry expert best known for his devotion to developing the entire elderberry market from the ground up. “There is no competition for elderberry producers and growers are desperately needed to fill the rising demand for elderberry products.”  Read more…safe PDF opens automatically.

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Parsley: More Than a Garnish

Curly parsley. Image via Wikimedia Commons No Copyright Via RanveigJill HendersonShow Me Oz
Parsley: That ambiguous and often frilly herb that many gardeners grow, but few actually use.  If you haven’t grown parsley yourself, you’ve surely bought it at least once or twice in your life to use as a garnish for dressing up platters or plates. Or, perhaps you’ve gone so far as to sprinkle it sparingly atop mashed potatoes or added a pinch here in there when making soup or stuffing.  And while many recipes call for at least a bit of fresh parsley, most people don’t go to the trouble – or worse yet, they use bland dried parsley from the grocery store.  (Egad!) If this sounds like you, I’m about to rock your kitchen and your herbal medicine chest by showing you that parsley is much more than a pretty garnish: it’s a virtual powerhouse of flavor and a game-changer for your health.  And best of all – it’s super easy to grow and use.

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Essential Herbs: Basil

Classic Genovese basil ready to harvest.By Jill Henderson – Show Me Oz

Summer just wouldn’t be summer without a plethora of lusty basil plants flourishing in the garden.  In fact, I love the sight, smell, and taste of these leafy annual herbs so much that I always over-plant in the spring and by mid-summer wind up with more basil than I need – or even know what to do with.  Yet, every spring when my husband asks me if I think we might just have too many basil starts, my reply is always the same… there’s no such thing as too much basil!

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America’s Native Bamboo – Part II – Identification and Culture

2012 2-13 February Snow (15)by Jill Henderson – Show Me Oz

In last week’s article, America’s Native Bamboo: History and Ecology, we learned that America was once home to massive colonies of native bamboo, better known as canebrakes. These lush cane forests played a critical role in the ecology of the regions they inhabited by filtering sediments, controlling erosion and providing food and shelter for many native animal and bird species. Cane also played an important role in the lives of the earliest inhabitants who valued it as a nutritional food plant and an important material used to fashion tools, weapons and lodging. In the early days of settlement, America’s native cane fields were first used to fatten cattle and then cleared for farmland. Today, a whopping 98% of America’s once-abundant native bamboo has been extirpated from the landscape. This week, I will discuss the ways in which native bamboos are being used in restoration projects and how we can help return them to their rightful place in nature and beautify the home landscape, all at the same time.

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The Winter Herb Garden: Bring it In!

Potted oregano Copyright Jill Hendersonby Jill Henderson – Show Me Oz

No matter how hard the bitter winds blow or how deep the snow gets, the avid gardener can still enjoy the sights, smells, and tastes of fresh home-grown herbs all winter long.  All you need is a few pots, some potting soil, and one or two relatively warm and sunny windowsills on which to perch them.  And while an indoor herb garden will likely produce less than those summer-grown herbs from the garden, they are still useful, flavorful and oh, so beautiful to look at.  In this week’s Show Me Oz we’ll talk about indoor herb gardens and how to grow your own, including special cultivars bred specifically to perform well in pots.

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Seeds & Spice: The Abundance of Herbs

Corriander Cilantro By Jill Henderson – Show Me Oz

If you grow  herbs in your garden for seasoning food, then you already know how easy and rewarding they can be.  After all, herbs season and preserve food and can be used for medicinal purposes, as well.  But did you know that many common herbs also produce spice in the form of fruits or seeds?  These seeds are not only flavorful and medicinal, but they can also be used to  start more herbs in the spring, as well.

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Garden Time: The Incredible, Edible Onion

onion 'rings'By Jill Henderson – Show Me Oz

Of all the vegetables, herbs and spices used to season food and heal the body, the unassuming onion is rarely given its proper dues.  Every day, billions of onions are sliced, diced, shredded, minced, fried, baked, dried, juiced and sautéed for our culinary pleasures, yet seldom do we sing its praises.  For a plant that serves so many needs and desires in our kitchens, gardens and herbal pantries, the savory, spicy-sweet goodness of onions in all their forms should be elevated to something nearing Nirvana.   Continue reading